SOCIAL
ADDRESS Suite 104, 370 St. Kilda Rd. Melbourne VIC 3004 Australia
CONTACT Phone: +613 9380 7764 Email: hello@sodesign.com.au
 DESIGNED, BUILT, HOSTED & COPYRIGHT © SO DESIGN AND BRANDING PTY LTD 2015 - ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Our goal is to provide useful ‘self help’ design and branding tools and resources, to small

businesses and entrepeneurs working to create or grow brands. The following examples will help

you work through the design and branding challenges your business faces, to get a great result.

BRAND PLANNING TOOLS HELPING ENTREPENEURS AND SMALL BUSINESS BUILD STRONG BRANDS

How to - Consumer Needs

One of the planning tools we find most useful is the NeedsMap above, which is used to map out which consumer needs will likely affect purchase decisions and brand choices in the category we are competing in. One of the reasons it is so useful is that we create the map ourselves - through researching the category and competitors and looking behind the brands to understand the motivation underpinning their positioning. Although it would be great to have Consumer Research to rely on - we often find that timing or budget mean that Research is not available and also that  for entrepeneurs, it’s a great business exercise to examine and understand the strengths and weaknesses of your competitors. In the example above - the Power Garden Category, we have identified a wide range of both functional and emotional needs that play a role in consumer purchasing decisions. The fun part is to then estimate how strong each competitor is agains each one of these needs - so that we can map strengths and weaknesses and see where our opportunities lie. In your own case think about the rational and emotional drivers for a purchase in your category first, then rate yourself and competitors as above.

How to - Category Audit

Your competitive set and the language of the category you operate in are key things you must understand if you are to create a brand that fits into the category of goods or services you want to target. Even more importantly, once you understand how your competitors are presenting their products and what claims they are making for themselves, you can design your own branding and communications to stand out with clear differentiation that consumers can see and understand. The key elements you need to collect are: each competitors logo each competitors key selling message an image of the competitors product, packaging or marketing material a breakdown of the colour palette each competitor uses Once you understand these elements you can then factor them into your brief to a designer to ensure that they consider how to represent your brand values in the context of the category and make choices of colours and form that are distinctive from those of your competitors.

How to - Target Audience Profile

90% of making a sale to someone depends on your understanding of why they might purchase what you have to offer and framing your offer to meet their needs. Many entrepeneurs and small business owners are also great sales people. However it is very limiting if your own ability to sell is the only thing that converts an opportunity into revenue. After all you can only be in so many places at once. What we encourage you to do is to design those same understandings of people and their motivations to purchase, into your branding, product packaging and communications. In particular this is critical in website design, where it is easy to be distracted by the technology and to forget what it takes to close the deal. Differences are just as important as similarities when it comes to segmenting customers. In the travel category there are two main groups of travelers - the mid to late 20’s and the over 50’s. Stage of life plays a huge role here in both the kind of travel, destinations and budgets of these audiences. So once you have identified your target audience it is important to further segment it down to groups with similar needs and messaging.

How to - Create a Brand

To create a strong and successful brand we need to create a Brand Framework or Consumer Value Proposition. This enables us to identify who we are targeting, what their needs are and what we offer that makes our brand more appealing to them, than other brands. To illustrate how to create a Consumer Value Proposition together with a new product concept, we have created a new product and its branding to bring the process to life. Please click the image below to download the pdf.

How to - Mood Board

When you have chosen your ‘route to market’ it then needs to be brought to life through a set of visuals, words, consumer value propositions and colours, that set the tone for the brand. Above is one ‘route to market’ which is taken from the set of three discussed to the left of this article, and expanded into a mood board which brings the feeling of the brand positioning to life. A mood board also provides us with the opportunity to sharpen the consumer benefit statement - and in the example above this food brand, which offers ease of preparation as a key feature, saves time which consumers can then use to ‘enjoy life’, without compromising on the nutritional value of the food prepared. The mood board then becomes a key tool used to describe and communicate the brand positioning to everyone who works on the brand, and a reference tool for new product development.  Any new product must make sense in the context of this brand positioning in order to add strength and credibility to the brand.

How to - Routes to Market

There are at least a thousand ways to solve any Creative Challenge so that art of the process is in deciding which 3 will best help position your brand as a winner in the eyes of consumers. Following is an example of three ways to position the same food product - each with its own appeal and potentially different target audience. Once these directions have been debated to decide which is the best opportunity for the brand one is chosen for further development. The next step is to prepare a Moodboard as you can see to the right of this article.
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BRAND PLANNING TOOLS HELPING ENTREPENEURS AND SMALL BUSINESS BUILD STRONG BRANDS

*©Copyright So Design and Branding Pty Ltd.

These materials are provided for individual use only

and may not be re-shared in any form whatsoever.

How to - Consumer Needs

One of the planning tools we find most useful is the NeedsMap above, which is used to map out which consumer needs will likely affect purchase decisions and brand choices in the category we are competing in. One of the reasons it is so useful is that we create the map ourselves - through researching the category and competitors and looking behind the brands to understand the motivation underpinning their positioning. Although it would be great to have Consumer Research to rely on - we often find that timing or budget mean that Research is not available and also that  for entrepeneurs, it’s a great business exercise to examine and understand the strengths and weaknesses of your competitors. In the example above - the Power Garden Category, we have identified a wide range of both functional and emotional needs that play a role in consumer purchasing decisions. The fun part is to then estimate how strong each competitor is agains each one of these needs - so that we can map strengths and weaknesses and see where our opportunities lie. In your own case think about the rational and emotional drivers for a purchase in your category first, then rate yourself and competitors as above.

How to - Category Audit

Your competitive set and the language of the category you operate in are key things you must understand if you are to create a brand that fits into the category of goods or services you want to target. Even more importantly, once you understand how your competitors are presenting their products and what claims they are making for themselves, you can design your own branding and communications to stand out with clear differentiation that consumers can see and understand. The key elements you need to collect are: each competitors logo each competitors key selling message an image of the competitors product, packaging or marketing material a breakdown of the colour palette each competitor uses Once you understand these elements you can then factor them into your brief to a designer to ensure that they consider how to represent your brand values in the context of the category and make choices of colours and form that are distinctive from those of your competitors.

How to - Target Audience Profile

90% of making a sale to someone depends on your understanding of why they might purchase what you have to offer and framing your offer to meet their needs. Many entrepeneurs and small business owners are also great sales people. However it is very limiting if your own ability to sell is the only thing that converts an opportunity into revenue. After all you can only be in so many places at once. What we encourage you to do is to design those same understandings of people and their motivations to purchase, into your branding, product packaging and communications. In particular this is critical in website design, where it is easy to be distracted by the technology and to forget what it takes to close the deal. Differences are just as important as similarities when it comes to segmenting customers. In the travel category there are two main groups of travelers - the mid to late 20’s and the over 50’s. Stage of life plays a huge role here in both the kind of travel, destinations and budgets of these audiences. So once you have identified your target audience it is important to further segment it down to groups with similar needs and messaging.

How to - Create a Brand

To create a strong and successful brand we need to create a Brand Framework or Consumer Value Proposition. This enables us to identify who we are targeting, what their needs are and what we offer that makes our brand more appealing to them, than other brands. To illustrate how to create a Consumer Value Proposition together with a new product concept, we have created a new product and its branding to bring the process to life. Please click the image below to download the pdf.

How to - Mood Board

When you have chosen your ‘route to market’ it then needs to be brought to life through a set of visuals, words, consumer value propositions and colours, that set the tone for the brand. Above is one ‘route to market’ which is taken from the set of three discussed to the left of this article, and expanded into a mood board which brings the feeling of the brand positioning to life. A mood board also provides us with the opportunity to sharpen the consumer benefit statement - and in the example above this food brand, which offers ease of preparation as a key feature, saves time which consumers can then use to ‘enjoy life’, without compromising on the nutritional value of the food prepared. The mood board then becomes a key tool used to describe and communicate the brand positioning to everyone who works on the brand, and a reference tool for new product development.  Any new product must make sense in the context of this brand positioning in order to add strength and credibility to the brand.

How to - Routes to Market

There are at least a thousand ways to solve any Creative Challenge so that art of the process is in deciding which 3 will best help position your brand as a winner in the eyes of consumers. Following is an example of three ways to position the same food product - each with its own appeal and potentially different target audience. Once these directions have been debated to decide which is the best opportunity for the brand one is chosen for further development. The next step is to prepare a Moodboard as you can see to the right of this article.
SOCIAL
ADDRESS Suite 104, 370 St. Kilda Rd. Melbourne VIC 3004 Australia
COPYRIGHT © SO DESIGN AND BRANDING PTY LTD 2015 - ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
CONTACT Phone: +613 9380 7764 Email: hello@sodesign.com.au

Our goal is to provide useful ‘self help’

design and branding tools and

resources, to small businesses and

entrepeneurs working to create or grow

brands. The following examples will help

you work through the design and

branding challenges your business

faces, to get a great result.

G+ GIVING BACK TO OUR COMMUNITY